substance use disorder

Receipt of Services among Adults in the US with Co-Occurring Serious Mental Illness [SMI] and Substance Use Disorder [SUD]

"Among the 3.6 million adults aged 18 or older in 2019 who had a co-occurring SUD and SMI in the past year (2019 DT 10.6), 66.6 percent (or 2.4 million people) received either substance use treatment at a specialty facility or mental health services in the past year, 52.0 percent (or 1.9 million people) received only mental health services, 12.7 percent (or 452,000 people) received both substance use treatment at a specialty facility and mental health services, and 1.9 percent (or 68,000 people) received only substance use treatment at a specialty facility (Figure 81 and 2019 DT 10.27).

NSDUH's Method For Estimating Prevalence Of "Illicit Drug Use Disorders" In The US

"Illicit drug use disorder is defined as meeting DSM-IV criteria for either dependence or abuse for one or more of the following illicit drugs: marijuana, cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, methamphetamine, or prescription psychotherapeutic drugs that were misused (i.e., pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, and sedatives). There are seven possible dependence criteria for specific illicit drugs:

Treatment Effectiveness at Reducing Levels of Offending

"Overall, lower levels of acquisitive offending and high-cost offending were recorded at follow-up. Among those who continued to offend, improvements in offending behaviour at follow-up, in terms of a decrease in its volume and/ or the costs associated with it, were observed. Crack users, injecting users, users with high SDS [Severity of Dependence Scores] scores, and those with previous treatment experience were more likely to offend than others at any point.

Estimated Prevalence of Substance Use Dependence or Addiction in the US by Race/Ethnicity, According to NSDUH

"In 2015, approximately 20.8 million people aged 12 or older had an SUD in the past year, including 15.7 million people who had an alcohol use disorder and 7.7 million people who had an illicit drug use disorder (Figure 27). An estimated 2.7 million people aged 12 or older had both an alcohol use disorder and an illicit drug use disorder in the past year (Figure 28). Thus, among people aged 12 or older in 2015 who had an SUD in the past year, nearly 3 out of 4 had an alcohol use disorder, and about 1 out of 3 had an illicit drug use disorder.

Estimated Number of Persons in the US Classified with Substance Dependence or Abuse

"NSDUH’s overall estimates of SUD include people who met the DSM-IV criteria for either dependence or abuse for alcohol or illicit drugs. In 2017, approximately 19.7 million people aged 12 or older had an SUD in the past year, including 14.5 million people who had an alcohol use disorder and 7.5 million people who had an illicit drug use disorder (Figure 39).

Estimated Number of Persons in the US with a Substance Use Disorder

"• Among people aged 12 or older, the percentage with a past year substance use disorder (SUD) (i.e., alcohol use disorder, illicit drug use disorder, or both) remained stable between 2015 and 2019. Among the 20.4 million people aged 12 or older with a past year SUD in 2019, 71.1 percent (or 14.5 million people) had a past year alcohol use disorder, 40.7 percent (or 8.3 million people) had a past year illicit drug use disorder, and 11.8 percent (or 2.4 million people) had both an alcohol use disorder and an illicit drug use disorder in the past year.

Substance Use Treatment in State and Federal Prisons

"The percentage of recent drug users in State prison who reported participation in a variety of drug abuse programs rose from 34% in 1997 to 39% in 2004 (table 9). This increase was the result of the growing percentage of recent drug users who reported taking part in self-help groups, peer counseling and drug abuse education programs (up from 28% to 34%). Over the same period, the percentage of recent drug users taking part in drug treatment programs with a trained professional was almost unchanged (15% in 1997, 14% in 2004).

Cost Effectiveness of Treatment vs. Law Enforcement in Reducing Substance Use

Cost Effectiveness of Substance Use Treatment

The RAND Corporation found that the additional spending needed to achieve a 1% reduction in the number of cocaine users varies according to the sort of program used, and that treatment is the most cost-effective:

Table comparing cost effectiveness of spending on treatment versus law enforcement for reducing substance use